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  #151  
Old June 6th, 2008, 01:52 PM
Ron Whitfield Ron Whitfield is offline
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Default Re: Post that pidgin vernacular from your island!

Earlier this week on www.coasttocoastam.com George Noory set up a line specifically for Hawaiian's to call in and speak pidgen, saying he'd heard about this interesting dialect and wanted to hear it.

What he got instead was locals actually sounding like they were trying to speak it.
Pretty lame.
I felt like telling him the real pidgen is spoken by locals that aren't listening to his show.
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  #152  
Old June 6th, 2008, 04:03 PM
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localmoco localmoco is offline
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Default Re: Post that pidgin vernacular from your island!

To me, "real pidgin" is a dying language. Some of my elder relatives who were born and raised on the plantation speak it. That was the only way they could communicate with people from all the various ethnic groups. But it seems like modern "pidgin" is becoming more and more just English spoken with an accent and sprinkled with some pidgin words.
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  #153  
Old June 6th, 2008, 04:23 PM
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Mike_Lowery Mike_Lowery is offline
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Default Re: Post that pidgin vernacular from your island!

Quote:
Originally Posted by localmoco View Post
To me, "real pidgin" is a dying language. Some of my elder relatives who were born and raised on the plantation speak it. That was the only way they could communicate with people from all the various ethnic groups. But it seems like modern "pidgin" is becoming more and more just English spoken with an accent and sprinkled with some pidgin words.
to me, it's not dying, but evolving, but I digress
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  #154  
Old September 16th, 2008, 08:30 AM
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Johanna Johanna is offline
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Default Re: Post that pidgin vernacular from your island!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul View Post
And I am impressed with what you wrote. You have shown that a pidgin speaker can also write eloquently in standard english. However I personally know several people who can only speak pidgin and barely even write.
Why should a pidgin speaker not be able to write eloquently? Pidgin speakers are bilingual or even multilingual, so are you saying that everyone speaking more than one language automatically has problems speaking or writing eloquently? Here is the linguistic credo of contemporary linguist Jack Chambers: "no language or dialect is inherently better than any other as a medium for explanation, exposition, narration, phatic communion or any other kind of communication. One of the tacit strategies of the elite is to install their own dialect as the "correct" one."
In the US, the "standard" is the dialect spoken in the midwest, but they might have decided to pick any other dialect. And I do know people from Ohio who still barely know how to properly write (their own dialect!). In English, misspelling has to do more with the confusing writing system which stems from Old English. The pronunciation has changed during history, but the writing system largely remained the same... why do you pronounce the 'gh' in 'tough', but not in 'though'. Does not make much sense, does it! So that is why so many have problems with writing and spelling - not because pidgin, or Hawaii Creole English, or any other variety destroys the ability to use proper English!!
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  #155  
Old July 10th, 2011, 06:28 PM
dakamaainahaole dakamaainahaole is offline
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Default Re: Post that pidgin vernacular from your island!

i trying fo revive dis 'chred... so my conchrbyushun kine is wot me modda used fo say... speak propa english li dat EXCEPT when she wen tell me go one batawata (go get a bottle of water) lol, good fun yaknoya? btw, she from pearl city, oahu
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  #156  
Old September 12th, 2013, 08:15 PM
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admin admin is offline
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Default Re: Post that pidgin vernacular from your island!

Yet another web wanderer has found this thread by searching for 'Holo Holo Slippers.' She provided the message below:
Quote:
Hi! I'm doing a little research on Holo Holo Slippers. I'm trying to round up any information/pictures of the product, of the people, or of the building back when it was Holo Holo Slipper Factory. I learned that it was owned by the Nagasawa family back in the mid 1940s. If you could post or email me @ zbowser [at] hotmail.com with any information, that would be helpful. Thank you very much for your time and effort in advance.
Diane
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  #157  
Old September 13th, 2013, 06:27 PM
Ron Whitfield Ron Whitfield is offline
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Default Re: Post that pidgin vernacular from your island!

When did wearing rubba slippa really become common in Honolulu, who started it, did WW2 have something to do with them becoming popular?
Was there originally a much different type than we see today?
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  #158  
Old September 13th, 2013, 10:53 PM
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D'Alani D'Alani is offline
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Default Re: Post that pidgin vernacular from your island!

I was born in 1947 and as far as I can remember there were rubbah slippahs, similar to the "Locals" style. Also popular were the tatami mat style zori's and the leather cross" slippers. I didn't wear shoes to school until I went Farrington. Here is a link to a photo of the cross slipper http://midlifecrisishawaii.com/wp-co...er-House-1.jpg

Last edited by D'Alani; September 13th, 2013 at 10:59 PM.
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  #159  
Old September 15th, 2013, 05:07 PM
Ron Whitfield Ron Whitfield is offline
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Default Re: Post that pidgin vernacular from your island!

Interesting about the tatami and cross slips, the cross shoould come back as a standard, it looks comfortable while the tatamis were hard and junk from what I remember.
I ask about a WW2 connection bringing on the fashion from reading the Kakaako book http://www.amazon.com/Kakaako-As-We-.../dp/1566479436 and the author mentioning kids wearing shoes or being barefoot at school post war, but recalls them never wearing slips.
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  #160  
Old September 15th, 2013, 05:54 PM
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D'Alani D'Alani is offline
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Default Re: Post that pidgin vernacular from your island!

Oh yeah slippers were worn only when you went "out" otherwise you were always "hadashi" or barefoot. When I attended Kalakaua most of us went to school barefooted that's why the cuffs of our "drapes" were shredded from dragging on the ground. Shoes were required once you entered high school.
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  #161  
Old September 15th, 2013, 06:33 PM
Ron Whitfield Ron Whitfield is offline
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Default Re: Post that pidgin vernacular from your island!

Growing up in 50's/60's LA I remember them coming on the scene around 1960 and being only pool wear, so Hawaii must have been the slipper vanguard. I wonder if they ever caught on in LA as basic outdoor footwear?
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