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Old August 11th, 2018, 07:38 AM
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helen helen is offline
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Default 2018 Primary Election Day

August 11, 2018 is the Primary Election Day in the State of Hawaii.

It has been a HawaiiThreads tradition to do a thread about the voting process for this event and to note your experiences in casting your ballot. If you already voted by absentee ballot you can relate your experience as well.
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Old August 12th, 2018, 01:31 AM
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helen helen is offline
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Default Re: 2018 Primary Election Day

Normally I would prefer to cast my vote on election day but I had an event that I to attend to today (8/11/18) and while it would have ended before the polls close I decided not to tempt fate and cast my ballot last week Saturday (8/4/18) at Honolulu Hale.

I got there about a half hour before it closed but there were a few people casting their ballots as well. The process went pretty fast.
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Old August 12th, 2018, 02:22 AM
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Lightbulb Re: 2018 Primary Election Day

Quote:
Originally Posted by helen View Post
I got there about a half hour before it closed but there were a few people casting their ballots as well. The process went pretty fast.
On that note, I cast my ballot about 5-6 minutes before the polls closed tonight. For those of use whose districts have “changed” before, my top concern was not whether or not I would get to the polling site in time. It was whether or not my polling place had been MOVED due to redistricting!

Thankfully, Ala Wai Elementary had a huge printout — posted on the wall outside of their cafeteria — where I was able to find my name.
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Old August 12th, 2018, 06:09 AM
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Default Re: 2018 Primary Election Day

The short story on August 11.

1. Went to polling place.
2. Signed polling book.
3. Worker did not ask me for I.D.
4. Got my ballot folder
5. Went to voting booth.
6. Discovered I had two ballots in folder.
7. Returned one of them to worker. Both were un-voted.
8. Went back with my one ballot, and voted.
9. Took to ballot processing machine: went in with no problem.
10. Got my stub. Walked out the door.

Long story: https://blog.hawaiifiles.com/?p=2328
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Old August 12th, 2018, 10:27 AM
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Unhappy Re: 2018 Primary Election Day

Quote:
Originally Posted by mel View Post
3. Worker did not ask me for I.D.
4. Got my ballot folder
5. Went to voting booth.
6. Discovered I had two ballots in folder.

[...]

Long story: https://blog.hawaiifiles.com/?p=2328
I'm not really commenting on mel's “short-hand” notes here. I read Mr. Ah Ching's full blog post which he provides a link for in the preceding HT post. I happen to know who he voted for — not because of his blog — but because of the energy he spent supporting a campaign I happened to have worked on personally.

Like mel, I noticed a huge difference in the way they structured the poll workers this year. I also noticed every worker thanking each other profusely for helping out.

There was indeed ONLY ONE precinct official who “checked me in” at the table with the ballots. I don’t recall signing the poll book, though I do remember the woman searching for my name before handing me a folder complete with a fresh ballot.

Even more disconcerting was the fact that there was no "receipt" attached to my ballot. I actually had to ask the worker assigned to the optical ballot scanning machine, “where's my stub?” The man proceeded to explain that they’ve “already boxed up all the receipts.” Did I still want a receipt? “Heck yes, I do!”

I realized later, as I was getting into my car, “there’s less than a 50/50 chance the number on this receipt matches up with the ballot I just cast.”

Things are not going in the right direction in terms of people getting involved in the political process. A poll worker is quoted in today's Honolulu Star-Advertiser as saying this was the “slowest (turnout) she can ever remember.” Exercise your rights as U.S. citizens and vote. I half expect that one day, there will be a “referendum question” that reads: “should term limits be abolished due to lack of interest and voter apathy among the electorate?” SMH.

Just another day in the nei.
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Old August 13th, 2018, 12:33 AM
Ron Whitfield Ron Whitfield is offline
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Default Re: 2018 Primary Election Day

after being infuriated the last time I tried to vote with my polling place closing down hours early and being too lazy for weeks to bother while knowing the probable outcomes I didn't go and vote this time, then it mostly ended up as I'd hoped, anyway. 20/20 will have me off my ass tho, you can bet.
I'm glad we've likely seen the last of the stone age denialista righty, John Carroll, for sure.
neither Ige nor Hanabusa deserved a win just on the homeless issues alone. just pathetic choices, but with Ige it's better the enemy you know... 4 more yrs and he's forgotten history. we got far bigger fish to fry nationally.
---
By Kevin Dayton - August 12, 2018
In a stunning reversal of political fortunes, Gov. David Ige brushed off opposition from much of Hawaii’s Democratic establishment Saturday on his way to defeating his top rival, U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa.
In the Republican primary for governor, House Minority Leader Rep. Andria Tupola handily defeated former state Sen. John Carroll, 88. Republican newcomer Ray L’Heureux was trailing far behind the two better-known GOP candidates.
Ige staged a dramatic turnaround in a re-election effort that was in deep trouble just six months ago, but ended with Hanabusa conceding the race in a speech shortly before 10:30 p.m. She said she is “not sure that I’ll run for any kind of political office again.”
Hanabusa soared in public opinion polls early this year, and by late March enjoyed a 20-percentage-point lead over Ige in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser Hawaii Poll. But those early poll results were apparently distorted by the short-lived public fury over the Ige administration’s botched initial response to the infamous Jan. 13 ballistic missile false alert.
A more recent Hawaii Poll in mid-July showed Ige pulling ahead of Hanabusa in the race, with 44 percent favoring Ige, and 40 percent picking Hanabusa.
Shifting race;
By early August, Democratic insiders were reporting the race had “flipped” in one community after another, with support shifting from Hanabusa to Ige. In Hilo, Kaneohe, Kaimuki and on Kauai, candidates who walked the districts reported the public appeared to be rallying around Ige.
Hubert Minn, a campaign worker who concentrated on improving Ige’s personal community ties, said the campaign was “very, very challenging,” but Ige stayed in the fight by “shaking people’s hands, looking them in the eye and really talking to them.”
Minn, who has a background in boxing, said Ige got “hit really hard” after the missile crisis, but “we got him back up and kept him in the game. We did two to three events a week where people could meet and talk to him and we saw the polls move.”
In her speech, Hanabusa thanked her supporters, her husband John F. Souza III, and U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard for their support, and praised campaign volunteers for their work on her behalf.
She told a crowd of her supporters that “we gave people choices, and the people have spoken. So, I don’t want anyone to feel like you didn’t do enough, or you could have done more, because believe me, the one thing that I know, I know just by being out there, is that you volunteers did the best job anyone could possibly, possibly ask for.”
Some longtime political observers believed Hanabusa was in trouble late in the primary because her campaign failed to convey her plans or priorities to the voters, and also suffered from bad timing.
One experienced Democratic campaigner said the Hanabusa camp failed to define Ige as an ineffective leader early in the campaign and shortly after the missile alert, when the public was ripe for that message. “They had David in a box, and they let him go,” said the longtime Democrat.
Another problem was that an advertising blitz in support of Hanabusa by the political action committee Be Change Now came too late to help her, said John Hart, chairman of the communications department of Hawaii Pacific University.
Be Change Now is a super PAC financed by the Hawaii Council of Carpenters, and it spent more than $400,000 on advertising attacking Ige in the final weeks of the campaign, and another $460,000 on ads supporting Hanabusa, according to state campaign spending records.
Hart said the carpenters made a crucial error by committing most of their resources early in this year’s campaign to supporting state Sen. Josh Green in his bid to become lieutenant governor.
“If Ige really was down by 20 points, they could have stepped in and buried him,” Hart said. “I think they thought it was a safe race, that Hanabusa was going to beat Ige, and so they decided to invest in the future and Josh Green. I think by the time they were aware of the numbers shift — which took many people by surprise, frankly — I think it was too late.”
Ige also faced formidable political resistance this year from the state’s Democratic establishment, including former Govs. Ben Cayetano and George Ariyoshi, who both supported Hanabusa.
Gabbard, who is one of the most popular figures in Hawaii politics, held a press conference early this year to endorse Hanabusa, citing Ige’s “failure of leadership” during the Jan. 13 ballistic missile false alert.
In March, the most powerful people in the state Legislature including House Speaker Scott Saiki, Senate President Ron Kouchi, House Finance Chairwoman Sylvia Luke and Senate Ways and Means Chairman Donovan Dela Cruz all signed a fundraising letter for Hanabusa criticizing Ige for “inattention, indecision and inaction.”
Former Gov. Neil Abercrombie also attacked Ige’s claims of accomplishment on environmental issues. Abercrombie was ousted by Ige in the Democratic primary in 2014.
Perhaps Ige’s most important political supporter was Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell, who told a crowd of Ige volunteers gathered at the Pagoda Hotel Saturday night that “you stuck with a man when it was difficult.”
Test of leadership;
Hanabusa and her allies attempted to make the race about leadership, largely by focusing on lapses such as the Jan. 13 missile alert that caused a public panic, and the 38-minute delay by the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency in notifying the public that it was a false alarm.
Almost from the start of his administration, Ige’s critics tried to portray him as indecisive and ineffective, alleging that his administration responded too slowly to problems such the dengue fever outbreak and the Thirty Meter Telescope protests in 2015.
When HI-EMA took 38 minutes to officially cancel the false alarm, that played into the political narrative of Ige’s opponents.
Ige admitted the state was unprepared for the accidental alert, but said steps were taken to make sure it would never happen again. The worker who triggered the alarm was terminated while two others resigned, and Ige said his administration was “open and transparent” about the inquiry into the false alarm.
Later in the election season, Ige clearly benefited from the state’s handling of flooding on Kauai and the Kilauea volcanic eruption in Puna. Harry Kim, the politically popular mayor of Hawaii island, endorsed Ige’s efforts in a dramatic television advertisement, saying that Ige “came through” for the island.
Ige, 61, has cited statistics showing Hawaii has the lowest unemployment rate in the nation, and data showing the number of homeless people has begun to drop while record numbers of visitors are coming to Hawaii. He also claimed that 5,300 new homes were built during his first term, although that statistic turned out to be misleading.
Ige went on the offensive in the campaign by challenging Hanabusa on her two-year push for a $75 million state tax credit for development of an aquarium at Ko Olina, alleging the deal demonstrated that she makes decisions “on behalf of self-interest and special interests.”
Hanabusa led the drive to get lawmakers to approve the Ko Olina tax credit in 2002 and 2003, but the bill was written so that only developer Jeff Stone could benefit from it.
The Honolulu Advertiser later reported that less than a month after the $75 million tax credit was approved, Stone sold a luxury Ko Olina townhouse to Hanabusa’s then-fiance Souza. One of Stone’s companies financed the sale by lending Souza $405,773 for the purchase, according to state records.
Souza, who is now Hanabusa’s husband and campaign chairman, bought the Kai Lani townhouse for $569,023 in mid-2003 and sold it for $990,000 in January 2004, according to city tax records.
Hanabusa has noted that Stone claimed only $3.45 million of the $75 million tax credit, and said there “has never been any wrongdoing found” in connection with the tax credit.
Hart said Hanabusa dominated in the forums where Ige and she appeared together in semi-debate formats, “but as we all know in politics, it’s not just about are you viewed as most competent. It’s about are you viewed as trustworthy, and are you charismatic, do people like you.''
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Old September 13th, 2018, 11:58 PM
terrence k. teruya terrence k. teruya is offline
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Default Re: 2018 Primary Election Day

Whew Ron, that was a long one but I read it all.
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