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  #1  
Old August 20th, 2004, 04:47 PM
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Default Flying Interisland

I'm starting this topic for the discussion of flying interisland on any of our various airlines. Currently flying Hawaii skies between the islands are:

Aloha Airlines
Hawaiian Airlines
Island Air
Pacific Wings

There are several other smaller carriers with service to various islands by charter or a limited schedule. Other airlines such as Trans Air are freight only operations. And of course we have the big domestic and foreign airlines that fly directly to and from the mainland to several neighbor island airports.

Then there are the fares. In my just completed trip I spent $79 on each flight from Honolulu to Hilo and back. And this was on Aloha, booked through their website using my AlohaPass card number. Your costs will vary on when you book, which airline you fly on, and whether or not you belong to their frequent flyer club.

Just this week I ordered 2 coupon books for $58 each flight on Aloha Airlines. There are 5 coupons in each book. So I guess I am good for 5 neighbor island trips between now and June 2005, when the coupons expire.

Prices stated here do not include security and other fees now associated with travel.

As many people know, flight coupons were very popular options to ticketing that island residents enjoyed for over 10 years. In 2003 the coupon books were discontinued by Hawaiian and Aloha Airlines in favor of online booking and ticketing. A lot of people have complained about the lack of flexibility when flying interisland today. Coupon books return that flexibility even for only a short time through Aloha Airlines' current promotion.

This is the only state in the union where we cannot simply drive our cars from one county to another. So far, despite the upcoming arrival of a ferry system in 2006, the airlines are the only way to get off one island to go to another.

Tell us about your interisland travels, reservations and ticketing experiences, stories of lost luggage (if any), missed flights, smooth and/or bumpy plane rides, etc.
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Last edited by mel; August 20th, 2004 at 04:48 PM. Reason: added URLs
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  #2  
Old August 21st, 2004, 04:23 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Having to stand in the general boarding line gave me the incentive to buy into Aloha's Executive Plus program. They have since upgraded that program but now you cannot buy into it you must be a major frequent flyer to qualify for it.

Hawaiian Airlines offer a similar program that allows you to pre-board and allows you to buy into it. I switched.

As for the superferry, I just wished it could've come into Hilo Harbor because making that 120-mile drive to Kona to get on that ferry and back doesn't make for a pleasant weekend drive to Oahu. You'll spend about 13-hours in transit total from Hilo to Oahu. In 13-hours I could've flown to Oahu from Hilo, bought everything I needed at Ala Moana, packed and shipped UPS and flown back to Hilo and still have time to go to KTA for some light grocery shopping.

My feeling is that we're making a big mistake not docking in Hilo.
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Old August 21st, 2004, 06:50 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

When I fly its always on the cheap. I don't belong to any Executive Club pass thing, or whatever with either airline. I don't mind standing in line and waiting like all the other grunts for the cattle call to shuttle us out of the airport into the airplane. Just did it again this week on my flight back to Honolulu.

One thing that I noticed that was different is that at Hilo Airport, they now let you wait in line on the top level near the gate of your flight instead of down below in the main lobby like before. I think this is good, because at least we can see the outside of the airport and planes taking off and landing there (though at Hilo there isn't too much air traffic except for tour helicopters coming and going).....

Flight pictures to Honolulu:

Aloha Air 737 to HNL
Goodbye Hilo
Aerial view of Mauna Kea
Arrived in Honolulu

Last edited by mel; August 21st, 2004 at 06:53 PM. Reason: added links
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Old August 23rd, 2004, 11:44 AM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

The smaller neighbor islands are getting shafted again. We're coming to Maui next week and taking a side trip to Molokai, where my father was raised on a farm. Since Hawaiian and Aloha no longer have flights to Hoolehua, we are having to fly on Island Air, which is no longer a subsidiary of Aloha.

It's costing us $378 for 2 people to fly from OGG to MKK. How are local people on Molokai supposed to afford that kind of plane fare? You can take the Molokai Princess, but that's a pretty long boat ride--tides and current permitting--and if you have business in anyplace other than Lahaina, you'd better have ohana or a rental car to get around because public transportation on Maui sucks.

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Old August 23rd, 2004, 12:29 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

The reasons why Hawaiian Air pulled out of Molokai/Lanai is that there was not enough demand for those flights requiring the larger jet and the fact that the longest runway at Molokai is only 4,494 ft., barely enough for the jet to take off and land on. Island Air's planes are smaller and ideally suited for short runways.
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Old August 23rd, 2004, 04:29 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Quote:
Originally Posted by mel
The reasons why Hawaiian Air pulled out of Molokai/Lanai is that there was not enough demand for those flights requiring the larger jet and the fact that the longest runway at Molokai is only 4,494 ft., barely enough for the jet to take off and land on. Island Air's planes are smaller and ideally suited for short runways.

Man you haven't lived until you land in Molokai on a Hawaiian Airlines jet. It's kinda like...like a carrier landing! As you fly in you see that manini runway and you ask yourself, "We going land on that bandaid?" To land on that runway you cannot eat up the runway by feathering your landing. Once your gears are over the runway you drop the sucker and boy those Hawaiian Airline pilots do, then they hit the reverse thrusters and slam the brakes and if you're not belted in good, you'll be kissing that upright tray in front of you.

Then you realize you still have too much forward momentum as you turn off the active runway onto the taxiway. The plane is turning but your body wants to go forward some more, hang on to your seats! More fun than riding the Bus standing up on Kapiolani Blvd.

Yeah the Molokai landing by a big jet can be the highlight of your Molokai stay. Oh then there's the take offs!
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Old August 23rd, 2004, 07:01 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Quote:
Originally Posted by craigwatanabe
Man you haven't lived until you land in Molokai on a Hawaiian Airlines jet. It's kinda like...like a carrier landing! As you fly in you see that manini runway and you ask yourself, "We going land on that bandaid?" To land on that runway you cannot eat up the runway by feathering your landing. Once your gears are over the runway you drop the sucker and boy those Hawaiian Airline pilots do, then they hit the reverse thrusters and slam the brakes and if you're not belted in good, you'll be kissing that upright tray in front of you.

Then you realize you still have too much forward momentum as you turn off the active runway onto the taxiway. The plane is turning but your body wants to go forward some more, hang on to your seats! More fun than riding the Bus standing up on Kapiolani Blvd.

Yeah the Molokai landing by a big jet can be the highlight of your Molokai stay. Oh then there's the take offs!
You don't know what that feels like unless you've landed or taken off from the San Diego Airport! You go straight down and land in between the marina and the buildings on the mainland on a very short runway. Taking off is also fun. Pittsburgh used to be the same way...if the plane missed the edge of the runway, you would have creamed right into the side of the hill that the runway was on.

My only issue is the high cost of having Island Air provide the only scheduled service between OGG and MKK. How do the folks on Molokai afford that on a regular basis? I guess they don't because that's why the majors pulled out?


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  #8  
Old August 23rd, 2004, 08:22 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Quote:
Originally Posted by Miulang
My only issue is the high cost of having Island Air provide the only scheduled service between OGG and MKK. How do the folks on Molokai afford that on a regular basis? I guess they don't because that's why the majors pulled out?
According to Island Air's website, they are currently offering special fares of $78.50 to a number of destinations including Molokai and Lanai. The catch is you must buy your ticket on the internet and probably book several days or weeks in advance.

If this is so, then it is like the other 2 major air carriers, Hawaiian and Aloha who also have some internet fare specials. My trip to the Big Island on Aloha cost $79 each way + those security fees. If I booked through Hawaiian, their "special" fare was $94. Both with the frequent flyer card.

Of course now, Aloha is offering coupon books for $58 each coupon in packs of 5. That offer expires August 31.

For travellers having to go off island like today or tomorrow with no prior arrangements usually have to pay the full fare of about $115 each way... for interisland. Ouch!

So for the time being anyone who bought a coupon book(s) through Aloha's current promotion will be in fairly good shape until June 2005.
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Old August 23rd, 2004, 08:29 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Quote:
Originally Posted by craigwatanabe
Man you haven't lived until you land in Molokai on a Hawaiian Airlines jet. It's kinda like...like a carrier landing
Many years ago Hawaiian Airlines used to fly their DC-9 jets into Waimea/Kamuela (MUE) airport on the Big Island. I loved the convenience that offered me since Waimea is only 20 minutes away by car from Honokaa. Anyway, I used to regularly fly into MUE from HNL when I was in college and also in my younger years... of course way back in the 1960s, Hawaiian only flew their propeller planes like the DC-6 and Convair 340 / 640 into that airport... however it was cool when the DC-9 jet service was implemented.

A landing at Kamuela's 5,190 ft. long runway is similar to that of Molokai. The moment the DC-9's wheels hit the ground, the pilot would throw the entire plane into reverse thrust, flaps fully in the downward position as we raced down the runway. Of course I usually like to sit in the window seat, and I know when we are running out of runway space is when the big white lines at the end show up and the plane is just about ready to stop... oh yeah, and the whole aircraft like vibrates big time when the reverse thrusters are on.... noisy and cool in a weird sort of way.

Kamuela has no taxiway, which means the plane has to do a sharp U-turn after the landing to meander its way back to the terminal.
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Old August 23rd, 2004, 11:05 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Quote:
Originally Posted by mel
According to Island Air's website, they are currently offering special fares of $78.50 to a number of destinations including Molokai and Lanai. The catch is you must buy your ticket on the internet and probably book several days or weeks in advance.
The whole point is I did make reservations via the Internet last week and I did qualify for the $78.50 fare. The problem is that fare is one way so for 2 people (when you count in airport taxes and whatever else they want to collect from you), the total came out to $348! How long would the aunties and uncles have to save in order to go visit ohana on the other islands?

For a long time, the major interisland carriers used to use the Mainland routes to subsidize the lower fares for the locals and between-island travel for tourists. Now, for some reason, they no longer offer "island hopper" fares to the tourists and certainly aren't doing local people any favors with the fares they are getting away with charging.

That $348 for 2 round trip tickets to Molokai is about what one SEA-OGG round trip ticket is costing us this trip. A 5-1/2 hour flight v. a 20-minute one for about the same amount of money. Gee...I can see the value of going holoholo to see the ohana! No wonder locals would rather go to Las Vegas than hop on a plane to Hilo to go see popo! Good thing you can still buy those coupon books!

Miulang
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Old August 24th, 2004, 02:44 AM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Quote:
Originally Posted by Miulang
The whole point is I did make reservations via the Internet last week and I did qualify for the $78.50 fare. The problem is that fare is one way so for 2 people (when you count in airport taxes and whatever else they want to collect from you), the total came out to $348!

That is the current cheapest fare. I too am just as vexed as you about the high fares interisland carriers are now charging to fly between islands. However with the cost of fuel and impact of direct flights to the neighbor islands not only by our 2 local major carriers, but most of the major ones too (American, United, etc.), I cannot see how the cost of flying can return to lower price points if there are not that many people flying interisland.

I hate the high cost of flying interisland even with today's discount fares. Because of that I have had to adjust and fly between here and the Big Island less than I did only a few years ago.

As individuals we all understand the power of our own buying dollar and we make adjustments accordingly. Unfortunately we are not like the government where we can turn to the taxpayers when our funds are short and ask for more money. No we have to earn it all and then prioritize our spending.
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Old August 24th, 2004, 03:39 AM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Just adding my perspective on this. Nearly 3 years ago AQ/HA considered
merging.At the time I thought it was a bad idea for a number of reasons.
But as the years go by I wonder sometimes what could've been if HA/AQ merged.
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Old August 27th, 2004, 03:38 AM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Looks like another new player is entering the interisland passenger market. Freight carrier TransAir is starting a charter airline called "Inter Island Airways" that will fly group charters between the islands.

According to this short Star-Bulletin article, Trans Air has acquired a new 30 passenger prop airplane and has already started service. From the article:

Quote:
Hawaii air-cargo carrier TransAir has begun operating a chartered inter-island passenger service that it plans to grow into a full-fledged airline.

TransAir founder and President Teimour Riahi said the company received federal approval earlier this month to begin carrying passengers aboard a 30-seat Bombardier propeller craft recently delivered to TransAir.
I went to the Bombardier website and found out this is the company that makes LearJets. They also seem to have been the firm that bought out DeHavilland of Canada. So they make the 30 seat prop plane known as the Q100 and it turns out to be none other than the Dash 8 which is the same plane flown by Island Air.

Kind of interesting. I don't know if Hawaii can support this many 2nd tier prop airlines. However if the price is right and they like fly to Waimea-Kamuela on the Big Island, I'd give them a try.

Of course that is after I use up all of my Aloha Airlines coupons.
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Old August 27th, 2004, 03:29 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Aloha is offering those $58 one way fare coupon books again right? That should be the cheapest fare floating around now.
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Old August 27th, 2004, 04:48 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Quote:
Originally Posted by mel
Looks like another new player is entering the interisland passenger market. Freight carrier TransAir is starting a charter airline called "Inter Island Airways" that will fly group charters between the islands.

According to this short Star-Bulletin article, Trans Air has acquired a new 30 passenger prop airplane and has already started service. From the article:



I went to the Bombardier website and found out this is the company that makes LearJets. They also seem to have been the firm that bought out DeHavilland of Canada. So they make the 30 seat prop plane known as the Q100 and it turns out to be none other than the Dash 8 which is the same plane flown by Island Air.
When I was a little kid, I used to fly interisland with my parents in Convairs, which were propeller-driven. Now it looks like we're coming full circle. If it means cheaper interisland fares, I'm all for them! But why only charters? That will only benefit the touristas on package vacations. And if it's a freight aircarrier, does that mean that the passengers will be herded aboard the planes like cargo a la Southwest Airlines?

Remember what I said in another thread about history repeating itself?

As an aside, Bombardier also makes monorail systems. They were in the bidding for the monorail system up here in Seattle, but pulled out because they didn't like some of the stipulations that were put on the bid.

Miulang

Last edited by Miulang; August 27th, 2004 at 04:50 PM.
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Old August 28th, 2004, 01:19 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Quote:
Originally Posted by Miulang
When I was a little kid, I used to fly interisland with my parents in Convairs, which were propeller-driven. Now it looks like we're coming full circle. If it means cheaper interisland fares, I'm all for them! But why only charters? That will only benefit the touristas on package vacations. And if it's a freight aircarrier, does that mean that the passengers will be herded aboard the planes like cargo a la Southwest Airlines?
Yes, I used to fly with my parents on Hawaiian Airlines' old Convairs as well as other prop planes of the times. And if the price is right I too will give the new airline a try.

According to the article I cited, the charter service is only the beginning for TransAir. They probably only have 1 passenger plane for now and will eventually ease their way slowly into the airline market. Who knows.

As TransAir they normally fly a Shorts 360 cargo plane. I seen those planes here in Honolulu as well as on Kona on the Big Island.

I have never flown on Southwest, but to me most airlines seem to all herd their passengers onto the aircraft like cattle.
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Old August 28th, 2004, 03:28 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Quote:
Originally Posted by mel
I have never flown on Southwest, but to me most airlines seem to all herd their passengers onto the aircraft like cattle.
IIRC, the Southwest model is still slightly different, as their planes are boarded like buses - every man, woman, and child for him or herself. That is, there are no assigned seats like there are on conventional airlines. You just show up at the gate, get on the plane, and sit anywhere you can.

Perhaps it seemed silly at the time to make a change like that for minor savings, but seeing as how some airlines are now charging you to eat their awful food just to cut a couple of bucks per passenger, the "quick and dirty" travel model Southwest is using seems positively progressive.
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Old August 28th, 2004, 05:04 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Quote:
Originally Posted by pzarquon
IIRC, the Southwest model is still slightly different, as their planes are boarded like buses - every man, woman, and child for him or herself. That is, there are no assigned seats like there are on conventional airlines. You just show up at the gate, get on the plane, and sit anywhere you can.
This is kind of what the interisland carriers do now, except with our interisland carriers they have those Ali'i Club and Premier Club things for people who want to pay more. So they get to go in the plane first and get first dibs at the seats they want before the rest of us dreks pile on at the "general boarding" cattle call.

I liked it better in the 60s and 70s where everyone was "general boarding" and there were none of these high falutin people ahead of those faithful who stood at the head of the line before the plane even shows up at the gate.

Aloha Airlines is kind of returning to this in a small way in the fact they eliminated their first class seats on all interisland flights. Hooray for Aloha!

So in this respect I could well live with a SouthWest Airlines policy. Good for them.

BTW, someone had earlier asked about what would have it been like if Hawaiian and Aloha had merged. If that awful thing would have happened the combined airline would have bled more red ink due to the sudden growth, not to mention that many jobs would have been eliminated since the interisland and even mainland routes are duplicated. A merged airline would also have been bad for the consumers since a monopoly would only encourage even higher prices than what we have now.

Of course I think an airline like SouthWest or JetBlue would have tried to enter the local market should that merger have gone through.

It is a good thing for consumers that we now have an independent 3rd airline, though unlike its predecessors Mid Pacific Airlines and Mahalo, Island Air is not playing the fare game by being the price slasher airline. That I am still waiting for.

Quote:

Perhaps it seemed silly at the time to make a change like that for minor savings, but seeing as how some airlines are now charging you to eat their awful food just to cut a couple of bucks per passenger, the "quick and dirty" travel model Southwest is using seems positively progressive.
I'll agree. Most air travelers are very price sensitive. That is why when a major airline announces a $5 to $10 fare hike, if the other majors don't go along, that airline usually backs down and continues to absorb the losses.

Tough being in the airline business.
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Old August 28th, 2004, 05:11 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Quote:
Originally Posted by pzarquon
IIRC, the Southwest model is still slightly different, as their planes are boarded like buses - every man, woman, and child for him or herself. That is, there are no assigned seats like there are on conventional airlines. You just show up at the gate, get on the plane, and sit anywhere you can.

Perhaps it seemed silly at the time to make a change like that for minor savings, but seeing as how some airlines are now charging you to eat their awful food just to cut a couple of bucks per passenger, the "quick and dirty" travel model Southwest is using seems positively progressive.
Yup. While most of the other carriers are crying red tears, there are only 2 more or less national scheduled carriers that are in the black: Southwest and Jet Blue. One of the ways they cut their costs is to only allow passengers to book flights through them (either via the Internet or on the phone); you can't book a Southwest or Jet Blue flight through a travel agent or through Cheaptickets or any of those alternative booking sites. Both airlines also are nonunion and yet the employees are pretty content. If you have cable TV, check the listings to see if your area gets "Airplane" (the A&E channel). They are filming episodes in LAX, Chicago and some other SWA hubs. It's a hoot sometimes to watch people willingly look like fools for the series! Guess they figure this is their only way to get their 15 minutes of fame, even though their neighbors are probably thinking, "I knew that person was a little odd, but I never could put my finger on why..."

Did you hear that United wants to start charging $15 to people who want to cash in their mileage for trips if they use the phone to do that? No charge if you use their website. They claim it is a "cost cutting" measure. Wonder if any of the other carriers will start doing the same? Sites like Cheaptickets also have started charging if you want "paper" tickets; no charge--yet--for etickets.

Miulang
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Old August 28th, 2004, 07:18 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

I've seen several episodes of Airline on A&E. They have it here in Honolulu on Oceanic cable. The entire series until recently focused on the everyday things at various SouthWest Airlines terminals. I recently saw a couple of episodes that were focused on a European discount airline whose name escapes me right now. In one of those episodes they showed that airline's CEO going to the Boeing plant in Washington state to pick up a brand new Boeing 737 jet.

As for the extra fees tacked on to paper tickets, they are doing it here for the 2 major interisland carriers as well (I think) as for Island Air and Pacific Wings. The airlines want everyone to buy their tickets from them, via their websites and by credit cards only.

Aloha's $58 coupon special charges a $3 fee per book if you buy the coupons through the regular mail using their forms printed on the newspaper ads. If you want your coupon book right away there is a $22 fee for FedExing, otherwise snail mail will get them to you in about 3 weeks.

I know some local travel agents who have either gone out of business or concentrate only on tours now because of how tickets are sold.

The consumers that suffer the most are the elderly and others who don't have ready computer access. They usually have to rely on friends or relatives or succumb to the $25 fee if they buy paper tickets through the phone or one of the few remaining airline ticket offices located in Honolulu and elsewhere.

The worst thing about th recent change in airline fares (besides the high prices) are the $25 change fees for interisland travel. This was something that was never implemented until the 2 major interisland airlines discontinued their coupon books in 2003. They have made travel inflexible for the budget minded.
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Old August 29th, 2004, 04:44 AM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

Quote:
Originally Posted by mel
I recently saw a couple of episodes that were focused on a European discount airline whose name escapes me right now.
I believe the name of that airline is RyanAir.They are the European version of Southwest.
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Old August 30th, 2004, 10:07 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

>>>This is kind of what the interisland carriers do now, except with our interisland carriers they have those Ali'i Club and Premier Club things for people who want to pay more. So they get to go in the plane first and get first dibs at the seats they want before the rest of us dreks pile on at the "general boarding" cattle call.

>>>I liked it better in the 60s and 70s where everyone was "general boarding" and there were none of these high falutin people ahead of those faithful who stood at the head of the line before the plane even shows up at the gate.

I fly interisland quite often (and to the West Coast a few times a year), and am one of those "high falutin (sic)" people with a Premier Club "thing." Since I fly so much, I trade in miles for the membership rather than pay cash. Anyone can get one of these cards if they pony up the cash (or miles) so I don't really see the problem. If I flew infrequently I probably wouldn't bother, it's really not that big a thing on the grand scheme.
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Old September 5th, 2004, 10:14 PM
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Default Re: Flying Interisland

The latest on this topic...

Charter Flights Are Taking Off as Customers Tire of Airline Hassles

OK, so charter planes are small and propeller driven. The demand for such interisland flights are attractive to many interisland travellers who are tired of the regular airline waits, security hassles and continuing higher prices.

From the Star Bulletin Article today, price comparison of interisland flights:

Quote:
>> Aloha Airlines: $279.20
>> Hawaiian Airlines: $222.20
>> Pacific Wings: $159.20
>> Charter plane: $200 (for full eight-seater)
>> Self-piloting: $60 (for full four-seater)
What the article fails to take into account though is that many residents have Hawaiian and Aloha Airlines frequent flyer cards (though many like me don't fly that frequently because of escalating costs) who can get round trip flights booked at a somewhat lesser price point than those posted above. As I mentioned before my last Aloha Airlines trip was $79 each way (not including fees).

Of course those who bought Aloha's $58 coupons have a good fare and a little more flexibility until at least June 15 of next year. The coupon offer is now expired.

The second headline of the day:

Fewer Hawaii Residents Travel Interisland

That is kind of obvious. High prices for interisland travel and fare restrictions (which were not reported in the article) have forced residents to cut back on neighbor island travel.

From the article:

Quote:
The annual study by SMS Research and Marketing Inc. indicates that the number of Hawaii residents traveling interisland has shrunk by 22 percent since 2000.

However, travel to the mainland grew 19 percent in the same period, possibly a sign that local travelers are trying to squeeze more mileage out of their travel dollar in a time of rising interisland air fares.
The article went on to say that more tourists used to fly interisland than locals, but direct flights to neighbor island airports have decreased the demand for interisland travel. Duh? Yes, I guess so. Still residents need to travel interisland at times and it is a real hassle with higher fares, change fees and restrictions and the longer waits at airport terminals because of security. Of course both Hawaiian and Aloha now emphasize Hawaii to mainland travel more often than not over their interisland routes.

Hawaiian Airlines are also offering their travel club members discount fares from Maui to Portland, Maui to Seattle and HNL to LAX during the off season. From an email I received from HAL:

Quote:

Honolulu and Los Angeles
Travel: Sep 1 - Dec 16, 2004

Days of the Week
Mon - Thu $122*
Fri - Sat $142*
* Taxes, fees & other restrictions apply
Is there a tabbing /table function or html we can use on this board?

Compare this to the last minute, interisland one way each trip fare of $115 and you are looking at only a $7 difference between destinations, but a distance of thousands of miles between the 2 types of trips. Ouch!

So in most cases, flying interisland sucks as far as your wallets go.
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Last edited by mel; September 5th, 2004 at 10:16 PM.
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  #24  
Old September 10th, 2004, 08:51 PM
Miulang Miulang is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,759
Default Re: Flying Interisland

OK, so we flew from OGG to MKK last Sunday on Island Air. Total cost for 2 roundtrip tickets: $348+ change. Lots of empty seats both coming and going.

With a hotel/car package: the car was about $32/day ($10 less than if booked directly through Dollar---can you say rip off?)

We watched passengers boarding the Molokai Princess on its afternoon run from Kaukanakai Harbor to Lahaina: round trip fare: $80. Boat was full, everyone lugging everything from big coolers to huge cardboard boxes on board.

At Kaunakakai Airport getting ready to leave for Kahului, we sat there and watched at least 4 Paragon Air flights and another smaller commuter airline take off and land, all appeared to be full. I think I read a roundtrip fare on one of the "nonscheduled" commuter lines was about $100.

Security: At the Kahului commuter terminal (which is what Island Air uses): no security check whatsoever. At Hoolehua, full security check (including the bomb detecting swipe of the checked luggage) and the metal detector. I guess they trust people flying to Molokai more than they do the ones leaving Molokai! What? They think Molokai people are all revolutionaries and carrying bombs or what???

Anyway, I don't know how Island Air can expect to stay in business flying to either Molokai or Lanai charging the kind of fares they do unless they cater strictly to tourists who don't know about alternatives. Because I know for sure that if I was really akamai and had the time, I would look at one of the alternatives to the scheduled carriers because only humbug now to fly with the scheduled carriers!

Miulang
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  #25  
Old October 9th, 2004, 09:38 PM
Miulang Miulang is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,759
Default Re: Flying Interisland

Looks like Island Air is capitulating little on the fares between HNL and MKK. Effective immediately, the fare (based on a round trip ticket) to either Molokai or Lanai goes down to $65 (or $130 RT) as opposed to the regular $105 OW tickets they've been selling. Wonder what they plan to do about their larcenous fares between OGG and MKK? We paid almost $90 OW/ticket last month and the planes were half empty both ways...

Miulang

Maui News story: http://www.mauinews.com/story.aspx?id=2016
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