Go Back   HawaiiThreads.com > Ka Nohona > Kaukau Korner
FAQ Members List Social Groups Calendar Search Search Latest Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old July 26th, 2008, 06:11 PM
shaveice's Avatar
shaveice shaveice is offline
Ali`i
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,671
Default Mana Bu's

for those who like japanese musubi's (they sell other stuff too), you should check this place out.

1618 King St
Honolulu, HI 96813
945-2323

it's in that little cluster of shops near the corner of punahou and king (about two doors away from baskin robbins).

someone else wrote a little review of it here:

http://www.yelp.com/biz/mana-bus-honolulu

personally, i like the simple musubi with ume and their coffee jello...
__________________
525,600 minutes, 525,000 moments so dear. 525,600 minutes - how do you measure, measure a year?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old July 26th, 2008, 09:08 PM
scrivener's Avatar
scrivener scrivener is offline
Ali`i
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Kapalama Heights.
Posts: 5,187
Send a message via AIM to scrivener Send a message via Yahoo to scrivener
Default Re: Mana Bu's

I just heard about this place from a friend and am eager to check it out. I love all kinds of cool things people do to riceballs.
__________________
But I'm disturbed! I'm depressed! I'm inadequate! I GOT IT ALL! (George Costanza)
GrouchyTeacher.com
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old July 27th, 2008, 12:57 PM
Pomai's Avatar
Pomai Pomai is offline
Ali`i
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Honolulu
Posts: 3,596
Default Re: Mana Bu's

They make riceballs? I thought that was supposed to be reserved for funerals?

Cool name though. Sounds like some "moke" name. "Wassup Mana Bu!" lol

I'm a musubi fan, so this is someplace I must check out. Thanks for the info!
__________________
The Tasty Island
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old July 27th, 2008, 02:42 PM
Honoruru Honoruru is offline
Ali`i
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Honolulu
Posts: 901
Default Re: Mana Bu's

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pomai View Post
They make riceballs? I thought that was supposed to be reserved for funerals?
I think a lot of people use the term musubi and riceball interchangeably, even though itís not ball-shaped at all (those are reserved for funerals--though to tell the truth, I donít ever recall seeing round riceballs at funerals). Actually, in Japan today, riceball is mostly called onigiri (and only sometimes called musubi, or to be more precise, omusubi).

I think this is another instance of local preservation of a term when it was first introduced at the turn of the century during the time of immigration. Now days, especially after the creation/invention of Spam musubi (probably in the 1980s), the term musubi is used almost exclusively for riceballs in Hawaii.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old July 27th, 2008, 03:00 PM
Pomai's Avatar
Pomai Pomai is offline
Ali`i
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Honolulu
Posts: 3,596
Default Re: Mana Bu's

Quote:
Originally Posted by Honoruru View Post
I think a lot of people use the term musubi and riceball interchangeably, even though it’s not ball-shaped at all (those are reserved for funerals--though to tell the truth, I don’t ever recall seeing round riceballs at funerals). Actually, in Japan today, riceball is mostly called onigiri (and only sometimes called musubi, or to be more precise, omusubi).
That's what I figured, but just thought I'd bring the subject up. What's funny is, my grandmother (who isn't Japanese of course) used to make us rice balls exclusively, most likely not knowing what it symbolized at the time. Mainly because it was easy for her to shape vs. trying to hand-shape into triangular form. She'd also salt her wet hands when making it, which really added flavor. Then she'd wrap the rice balls in several layers of nori. I mean, CHOKE nori. lol But was ono!

<ot>Speaking of Japanese etiquette, I was reminded by a reader of my blog that sticking chopsticks in rice is a no-no, as that represents death. Gosh, I felt like a DOOF, as I had been photographing a number of dishes I made over the course of blogging, doing that just because I thought it looked good in the shot. Ack! Never again. It's also a no-no to pierce food using chopsticks or to criss-cross them for the same reason. Gotta' respect the culture.</ot>

Shoots, I wanted to check out Mana Bu's today, but they're closed. That yelp reviewer made it sound really good!
__________________
The Tasty Island
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old July 27th, 2008, 10:13 PM
shaveice's Avatar
shaveice shaveice is offline
Ali`i
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,671
Default Re: Mana Bu's

howzit pomai! yeah, you'll like it. their hours are weird; something like 11 am ~ 3 pm! to be on the safe side, call before you go and let us know what you think afterwards.

btw, the couple who run the place is from japan and their portions are typically japanese (on the small side): taste over quantity.

if it's not crowded, have a chat with them cuz they're super nice and love to talk about their products (they hand make everything in that shop!).
__________________
525,600 minutes, 525,000 moments so dear. 525,600 minutes - how do you measure, measure a year?
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old July 27th, 2008, 11:39 PM
scrivener's Avatar
scrivener scrivener is offline
Ali`i
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Kapalama Heights.
Posts: 5,187
Send a message via AIM to scrivener Send a message via Yahoo to scrivener
Default Re: Mana Bu's

Please. A triangle-shaped musubi is not a riceball? Sure it is. A ball doesn't have to be spherical to be a ball. What shape is a puck or a football?

As for omusubi and onigiri, the terms are practically interchangeable. My mom (who is from Japan) has always called them onigiri, but she has never corrected me when I've called them musubi. The "o" in front of a Japanese word usually indicates a level of formality; as far as definitions go, "omusubi" and "musubi" mean the same thing, as do "obenjo" and "benjo," "otearai" and "tearai," and "otanjoubi" and "tanjoubi." I have been corrected by other HTers on matters of Japanese linguistics before and welcome them again, but this is what I understand.

I'm destitute until Thursday, but I think Thursday is an excellent day for me to check this place out. I'm super super super super curious.
__________________
But I'm disturbed! I'm depressed! I'm inadequate! I GOT IT ALL! (George Costanza)
GrouchyTeacher.com
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old July 28th, 2008, 04:28 AM
shaveice's Avatar
shaveice shaveice is offline
Ali`i
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,671
Default Re: Mana Bu's

found two articles about Mana Bu's!

* from My Aloha Vibe:
http://myalohavibe.com/mana-bus/


* from pacific business news:
http://pacific.bizjournals.com/pacif...0/story11.html

shocking revelation from PBN: "The menu is the brainchild of Fumiyo Asaoka, a licensed nutritionist and graduate of Japan Women's University. Her husband, Manabu Asaoka, has a marketing degree from Hawaii Pacific University and Tokyo University Foreign Language School."

Wow!

Days and Hours: Mon-Fri 11am-2pm & 4pm-5:30pm Sat 11am-2pm Sun Closed
Attached Images
File Type: jpg manabu_sign.jpg (28.7 KB, 3 views)
__________________
525,600 minutes, 525,000 moments so dear. 525,600 minutes - how do you measure, measure a year?

Last edited by shaveice; July 28th, 2008 at 04:33 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old July 29th, 2008, 12:11 AM
Walkoff Balk Walkoff Balk is offline
Ali`i
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 5,883
Default Re: Mana Bu's

Quote:
Originally Posted by Honoruru View Post
I think a lot of people use the term musubi and riceball interchangeably, even though itís not ball-shaped at all (those are reserved for funerals--though to tell the truth, I donít ever recall seeing round riceballs at funerals). Actually, in Japan today, riceball is mostly called onigiri (and only sometimes called musubi, or to be more precise, omusubi).

I think this is another instance of local preservation of a term when it was first introduced at the turn of the century during the time of immigration. Now days, especially after the creation/invention of Spam musubi (probably in the 1980s), the term musubi is used almost exclusively for riceballs in Hawaii.
I thought a riceball would be in a bento(I can't remember the old school word for lunchbag) when you go hana hana in the field. The riceball would be so big with the umi center because it's hard work and you have an apetite of a sumo wrestler.
You call it riceballs now to kids. They'll start giggling.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old July 29th, 2008, 12:15 AM
bf334's Avatar
bf334 bf334 is offline
Haumana
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Mililani
Posts: 39
Default Re: Mana Bu's

"Speaking of Japanese etiquette, I was reminded by a reader of my blog that sticking chopsticks in rice is a no-no, as that represents death."

I believe that the chopsticks in the rice bowl being a no-no is because the chopsticks look like the insense (sp?) that you put on an alter for the dead.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old August 1st, 2008, 10:09 PM
scrivener's Avatar
scrivener scrivener is offline
Ali`i
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Kapalama Heights.
Posts: 5,187
Send a message via AIM to scrivener Send a message via Yahoo to scrivener
Default Re: Mana Bu's

Quote:
Originally Posted by scrivener View Post
I'm destitute until Thursday, but I think Thursday is an excellent day for me to check this place out. I'm super super super super curious.
Well I am destitute no longer (well, until a few days from now, probably) and wasted no time in checking it out.



This photoís not great because I had my white-balance set to tungsten instead of sunlight and had to adjust the colors in Photoshop, which I suck at. However, I think itís clear that these are some nicely made musubis. At the top is the ten-grain hijiki musubi, which was very flavorful with a nice, nutty texture. The salty flavor of the hijiki really added to this; it was my favorite of the lot. To the right of the hijiki is the curried musubi (ordered by a friend). Nice flavor here, but I think it needed some kind of meat, like a little bit of chopped chicken or something. Next to that is the baked salmon brown-rice musubi, ordered by Reid. You gotta love all that nori, but my friend's first words were ďnot being able to see the salmon is a bad sign.Ē

Perhaps. But when you eat an ume musubi, you donít expect the ume to be in every bite (although that would be great, come to think of it). This was actually quite good, and if I liked salmon a little bit more Iíd think it was great. Next is something I used to experiment with in college: misoyaki musubi with brown rice. My friends responded quite positively to this; I thought it was good, but I wanted more miso flavor. The fact that the musubi is (Iím guessing) pan-fried makes this really nice; I like the crusty exterior a LOT, but that did take some of the miso flavor out.

At the bottom is the ume edamame musubi, the only white-rice musubi I ordered. For white rice, Mana Bu uses Tamanishiki, which is one of those two-bucks-per-pound premium rices they sell in mylar bags. I think the simplicity of this musubi really made the quality of the rice stand out; always a good thing, in my book. This had bits of ume mixed in with the rice, which I loved.

In the upper left is some kind of chocolate muffin another friend ordered and I didnít try. Next to that is a teri grilled corn, ordered by a friend. Flavorful and nice, but at two bucks probably overpriced.

The musubis we purchased ranged from $1.25 to $1.50 each, which when you consider the price of a spam musubi at 7-Eleven is quite a deal. It should be evident from the photo that this is a lovingly, carefully made product. Someone cares about quality work here, and that goes a long way with me. I am definitely headed back sometime before the end of my summer break. This is a great lunch.
__________________
But I'm disturbed! I'm depressed! I'm inadequate! I GOT IT ALL! (George Costanza)
GrouchyTeacher.com
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old August 1st, 2008, 10:48 PM
Pomai's Avatar
Pomai Pomai is offline
Ali`i
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Honolulu
Posts: 3,596
Default Re: Mana Bu's

Scriv, great write-up! Do you have macro pics of each Musubi, unwrapped? That would be great.

I think the 10-grain Hijiki would be my fav' as well.

You mentioned "ume in every bite". Well, there is a product that could satisfy that request! At Marukai, they sell a flavored nori that has little bits of real, dried Ume speckled into each sheets. It's kinda' expensive though... like $5 for a just 9 half-sheets. Still, Ume is getting pricey nowadays as well, so that could be a bargain if it really does have the flavor profile.

Grilled Teriyaki-glazed corn is indeed oishii, and at $2 each, it's not THAT bad in price. I've seen worse. That's probably the perfect accompaniment with those "Haute" Musubi offerings. One of that and a couple of Musubi and I'd be good for lunch.
__________________
The Tasty Island

Last edited by Pomai; August 1st, 2008 at 11:27 PM. Reason: Didn't scroll up before posting. Ack!
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old August 1st, 2008, 11:42 PM
Walkoff Balk Walkoff Balk is offline
Ali`i
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 5,883
Default Re: Mana Bu's

My favorite meat ingredient in a sushi is an eel.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old October 23rd, 2008, 05:55 PM
shaveice's Avatar
shaveice shaveice is offline
Ali`i
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,671
Default Re: Mana Bu's

they've been so successful that there's usually a line of people waiting to get in when they open. great for the business but lousy for customers cuz they're often sold out by noon! and who wants to wait in a long line with very limited parking?

oh well...

in today's advertiser...

http://www.honoluluadvertiser.com/ar...uNmWmkrg+OA%3D
__________________
525,600 minutes, 525,000 moments so dear. 525,600 minutes - how do you measure, measure a year?
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old December 17th, 2008, 04:05 PM
salmoned's Avatar
salmoned salmoned is offline
Ali`i
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Centered - sides are for suckers
Posts: 1,527
Default Re: Mana Bu's

I made it here the other day - thanks for the post, I really enjoyed the food. I wish they were closer to Ewa.
__________________
May I always be found beneath your contempt.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old December 17th, 2008, 10:02 PM
dick's Avatar
dick dick is offline
Kumu
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 666
Default Re: Mana Bu's

While often used interchangeably, I suspect the differences between onigiri and musubi stem from the roots of the words.

Musubi -- from the verb musubu, to wrap or tie. Musubi tend to wrapped in nori, etc.

Onigiri -- from the verb nigiru, to mold with the hands, as in sushi. Onigiri tend to be variously shaped and unwrapped. Although for the most part onigiri seems to be the word used for any riceball wrapped or not.

As for the chopsticks in the rice... at a funeral, a small bowl of rice is set out in front of the body, and the chopsticks are stabbed into the center. This is the only time you see this, so when someone inadvertently does this it, it's quite awkward.

Also, don't pass food to another person chopstick to chopstick. The only time this is done is at the crematorium when family pass the unburned bones along from the table to the urn. Best to pass the plate so they can grab the food themselves.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
eating out, rice

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.

  Partner Sites: Hawaii Blog Hawaii News Hawaii Grinds Hawaii Social Media  
    Blogging the Aloha State. The Hawaii Star. Hawaii Food Blog. The story of Aloha 2.0.